Articles tagged "New York Times"

Thriller Thursday (3/20/14 Edition)

Happy #ThrillerThursday, friends! Here's a look at the latest books keeping us up past bedtime:

THE CAIRO AFFAIR by Olen Steinhauer
Steinhauer's geopolitical tale about a murdered diplomat, his unfaithful wife, her Egyptian intelligence ex-lover, and a CIA analyst recently earned a rave New York Times review from Janet Maslin: “Elaborate, sophisticated…a long, twisty road full of cleverly placed potholes and unexpected turns. Mr. Steinhauer draws his spies as flesh-and-blood characters in whom his readers invest both attention and emotion.”

DECODED by Mai Jia
“Told by a shadowy narrator who draws on interview transcripts and declassified documents, the book ranges in style from mythic fairy tale to spy story to epistemological speculation. Within this fantastic framework unfolds the saga of Rong Jinzhen, a youngster of illegitimate origin and odd upbringing whose phenomenal success in his non-chosen field leads to international counterespionage.” — The Wall Street Journal
BONUS: read the interview with Mai Jia in the New York Times Sinosphere blog

DON'T LOOK FOR ME by Loren D. Estleman
In the 24th(!) book in the Amos Walker series, the "barely housebroken" P.I. finds himself caught between the mafia and the porn industry. "A direct descendant of Sam Spade and Philip Marlowe, Walker fires up a cig, has a sip of Scotch, and ponders how the case of a disappeared wife can get this complicated. A very good entry in a solid series." — Booklist

THE TRIDENT DECEPTION by Rick Campbell
"Campbell utilizes his background as a retired navy commander and his familiarity with submarines to craft a terrific thriller debut. Campbell does an amazing job, balancing character interaction with high-octane action, all the while keeping the technical jargon to a level understandable by nonmilitary readers. This is the best novel about a submarine since Tom Clancy’s classic THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER." — Booklist, starred review

What's tingling your spine this #ThrillerThursday? Share your reads with us @MacmillanLib.
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#BookBday Bonus: THE SIXTH EXTINCTION

We've got another special Book Birthday this week: THE SIXTH EXTINCTION by Elizabeth Kolbert, which started as a two-part series in the New Yorker.

Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly contracted. Scientists are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. The cause? Humans! (GULP.)

THE SIXTH EXTINCTION has FOUR outstanding starred pre-publication reviews and major media coverage is starting off with a Big Bang:
* A front page rave New York Times Book Review from former Vice President Al Gore
* A New York Times daily review by Michiko Kakutani
* Appearances on CBS "This Morning" and "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart"
* Interviews on NPR's "All Things Considered" and "Fresh Air"
* Reviews to come in Scientific American Magazine, The Economist, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and many more


Praise for THE SIXTH EXTINCTION:

“'People change the world,' Kolbert writes, and she vividly presents the science and history of the current crisis. Her extensive travels in researching this book, and her insightful treatment of both the history and the science all combine to make THE SIXTH EXTINCTION an invaluable contribution to our understanding of present circumstances, just as the paradigm shift she calls for is sorely needed.”
New York Times Book Review by Al Gore

“New Yorker staff writer Kolbert accomplishes an amazing feat in her latest book, which superbly blends the depressing facts...with stellar writing to produce a text that is accessible, witty, scientifically accurate, and impossible to put down.”
Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Rendered with rare, resolute, and resounding clarity, Kolbert’s compelling and enlightening report forthrightly addresses the most significant topic of our lives.”
Booklist, starred review

“A highly significant eye-opener rich in facts and enjoyment.”
Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"This solid, engaging, multidisciplinary science title should appeal to a broad range of science enthusiasts, particularly those interested in environmental conservation.”
Library Journal, starred review
(also featured in Neal Wyatt's RA Crossroads review)

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Subway Success Story: THE RACE UNDERGROUND

“The blizzard of 1888 was the trigger that cities needed to finally acknowledge that the horse-pulled carriages, the steam-powered elevated trains, the cable-pulled trolleys and even the electrified street railways all suffered from the same flaw that could no longer be ignored. They were at the mercy of the skies.”
– THE RACE UNDERGROUND


Forget Chris Christie's bridge saga–we've got an even better true life story about a rivalry between cities and brothers that resulted in an invention that changed the lives of millions: THE RACE UNDERGROUND by Doug Most.

When the great blizzard of 1888 brought New York City to a halt, citizens realized a new transportation solution had to be found. Enter two brothers–Henry Melville Whitney of Boston and William Collins Whitney of New York City. Each man shared the same dream: that their city would be the first to have a subway system. And with that, the great race was on!

This riveting story is a Junior Library Guild selection, making it a great choice for younger readers interested in transportation history. It's also a great recommendation for adult readers who enjoy Erik Larson and David McCullough.

“Mr. Most weaves together the egos, political hurdles and other daunting challenges…in a sweeping narrative of late-19th-century intrigue.” – Sam Roberts, The New York Times

"An almost flawlessly conducted tour back to a time when major American cities dreamed big." – Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"...A remarkably well-told story filled with villains, heroes, and events of the Gilded Age...." – Library Journal

"[Most] delivers a fun and enjoyable read about a vital, transformative period.” – Publishers Weekly

“This book proves again that American history is a treasure trove of great stories, this one filled with drama, sacrifice, loss and unimaginable success.” — Ken Burns, filmmaker, creator of the PBS series "The Civil War"

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9/11: Twelve Years Later

Today is a painful day in our national history as we remember the tragic events of 9/11. There is a saying that "time heals all wounds" and while the truth of that statement may be up for debate, we can agree that time brings us insight and knowledge:

102 MINUTES: The Untold Story of the Fight to Survive Inside the Twin Towers
by Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn

At 8:46 am on September 11, 2001, 14,000 people were inside the twin towers. Over the next 102 minutes, each would become part of a drama for the ages. Drawing on hundreds of interviews with rescuers and survivors, thousands of pages of oral histories, and countless phone, e-mail, and emergency radio transcripts, New York Times reporters Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn tell the story of September 11 from the inside looking out.


A HISTORY OF THE WORLD SINCE 9/11: Disaster, Deception and Destruction in the War on Terror
by Dominic Streatfeild


Acclaimed author and journalist Dominic Streatfeild traveled across the world for years in pursuit of answers for this stunning collapse of international law. The results of his search form the most fully realized study of the war on terror yet written. Piercing reportage blends with sobering human drama, woven into eight narratives of how our world went wrong after 9/11.


THE 9/11 REPORT: The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States
by Thomas H. Kean, Chair, and Lee Hamilton, Vice Chair; With analysis and reporting by The New York Times

A New York Times Notable Book of 2004, this complete edition of the 9/11 Report by the independent 9/11 Commission examines what happened that day, the lessons we learned and provides recommendations as to how we can prevent future attacks.

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The Posthumous Publication of Patrick White's The Hanging Garden

THE HANGING GARDEN is a rare treat; it's an unfinished coming-of-age story by Nobel Prize-winner Patrick White, found and published posthumously. It's a complex work that covers multiple viewpoints and is an excellent option for young adults looking for a challenging and engaging summer read.

Sydney, Australia, 1942.

Two children, on the cusp of adolescence, have been spirited away from the war in Europe and given shelter in a house on Neutral Bay, taken in by the charity of an old widow who wants little to do with them. The boy, Gilbert, has escaped the Blitz. The girl, Eirene, lost her father in a Greek prison. Left to their own devices, the children forge a friendship of startling honesty, forming a bond of uncommon complexity that they sense will shape their destinies for years to come.

"THE HANGING GARDEN is a novel for our time—a story about parentless children, mistreated by a world that, by its lights, intends no harm but nonetheless does enduring damage. [...] Digging up a novelist’s work from his grave is a messy business. [...] David Marr, White’s biographer, and others dedicated to White’s memory, decided to give us THE HANGING GARDEN. They were right to do so, and we should thank them for it." —The New York Times

"What White has left is a complete, complex, and beautiful portrait, an important addition to classic contemporary fiction." —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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We Called It

This is just to say we told you so.

In fact, we've said it again and again: you must read ELEANOR & PARK! Rainbow Rowell has created a magnificent, heartbreaking, and uplifting novel that both your teens and adult patrons will love.

Still don't trust us?! Fine, but do you trust John Green? I thought so. He wrote a rave recommendation for ELEANOR & PARK in The New York Times.

He said,

"[T]he obstacle in ELEANOR & PARK is simply the world. The world cannot stomach a relationship between a good-looking Korean kid and Big Red. The world cannot allow Eleanor a boyfriend of any kind, because she’s poor and fat and dresses funny. The world cannot allow Park a girlfriend because he likes wearing eyeliner, and everyone knows that’s gay. The world is the obstacle, as it always is when you’re 16 and truly in love."

He also said,

"ELEANOR & PARK reminded me not just what it’s like to be young and in love with a girl, but also what it’s like to be young and in love with a book."

eleanor & park

Click the image to read the full article on Griffin's Facebook page.

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The New York Times' Notable Books of 2012!

Wow! Twenty of the one hundred excellent selections from The New York Times' Notable Books of 2012 list are published or distributed by Macmillan! Take a look:

Fiction:

ALMOST NEVER By Daniel Sada

AN AMERICAN SPY By Olen Steinhauer

AT LAST By Edward St. Aubyn

THE BOOK OF MISCHIEF By Steve Stern

BRING UP THE BODIES By Hilary Mantel

BY BLOOD By Ellen Ullman

CITY OF BOHANE By Kevin Barry

THE FORGETTING TREE By Tatjana Soli

HHhH By Laurent Binet

HOW SHOULD A PERSON BE? By Sheila Heti

THE RIGHT-HAND SHORE By Christopher Tilghman

SALVAGE THE BONES By Jesmyn Ward

SHINE SHINE SHINE By Lydia Netzer

THE STARBOARD SEA By Amber Dermont

SWIMMING HOME By Deborah Levy

Nonfiction:

ALL WE KNOW By Lisa Cohen

THE GREY ALBUM By Kevin Young

HAITI By Laurent Dubois

MY POETS By Maureen N. McLane

PEOPLE WHO EAT DARKNESS By Richard Lloyd Parry

SOMETIMES THERE IS A VOID By Zakes Mda

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Revenge is a Dish Best Served Baked!

We've drooled over Jessica Beck's Donut Shop Mysteries with you before, and we're (unsurprisingly) back at it.

Yesterday Talia noticed POWERED PERIL, the latest installment in this delicious series featuring a small-town baker turned amateur sleuth, made the New York Times mass market fiction extended bestsellers list!

"An astute sleuth and an appealing smalltown setting help make this a winner, along with tempting donut recipes interspersed throughout." -Publishers Weekly on KILLER CRULLERS

READERS BEWARE:

"This delicious new mystery/recipe series will give readers some serious doughnut cravings." -Publishers Weekly on GLAZED MURDER

You've been warned.

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Monday Fun Day! (8/13/2012 Edition)

Happy Monday!

- We're very excited to see some really excellent fiction published by Tor on the official ballot for the 2012 World Fantasy Awards! Jo Walton's AMONG OTHERS is up for Best Novel and two wonderful anothologies BLOOD AND OTHER CRAVINGS edited by Ellen Datlow and THE WEIRD edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer (which kept me company one dark and lonely workday) are both up for Best Anthology!

- Lydia Netzer's debut novel, SHINE SHINE SHINE, is a New York Times Editors' Choice!

- And for all you librarians out there moonlighting as writers, the 2013 Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America First Crime Novel Competition is now open. Last year's winning novel, A SIMPLE MURDER, was written by a librarian! Let's make it two years in a row!

- Also:

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