Articles tagged "Girlchild"

Booklist's Best Adult Books for Young Adults 2012

We're very excited to see four of our fine titles on Booklist's 2012 Editors’ Choice list of the best Adult books for a Young Adult audience.

That Adult-to-Teen crossover appeal makes these titles special for us and accessible to all of your patrons.

Here are the Macmillan titles:

GIRLCHILD by Tupelo Hassman

LITTLE STAR by John Ajvide Lindqvist

THIS IS HOW: Proven to Aid in Overcoming Shyness, Molestation, Fatness, Spinsterhood, Grief, Disease, Lushery, Decrepitude & More, for Young and Old Alike by Augusten Burroughs

RAIDERS!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made by Alan Eisenstock and others

The full list has not been posted online, yet. When I see it, I will update this post.

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Tuesday Fun Day! (9/25/2012 Edition)

Happy Tuesday, all!

- Tupelo Hassman's debut GIRLCHILD has been shortlisted for the 2012 Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize! This prize, awarded by The Center for Fiction and the American Booksellers Association, is awarded to the best debut novel of the year. The winner will be announced on December 11th, 2012 at the Center for Fiction Annual Benefit & Awards Dinner. See all of the nominees here.

Raisin 20 years banner

- We're celebrating 20 years of small-town Mysteries starring feisty amateur sleuth Agatha Raisin! Reviews for M.C. Beaton's latest (ehem, twenty-third!) Raisin Mystery, HISS AND HERS, praise Beaton for continued quality and fun in her long-running cozy series.

"Kudos to 20 years of sleuthing for Agatha Raisin, a standard-bearer for the cozy." -Library Journal

"This well-written series is still going strong and will appeal to fans of Sue Ann Jaffarian and Mary Daheim." -Booklist

Sign in to our Mystery community site CriminalElement.com to read an excerpt and enter to win the entire twenty-two volume set of Agatha Raisin Mysteries!

- Looking for the next 50 SHADES OF GREY read-alike? Try ANYTHING HE WANTS from from self-published phenomenon Sara Fawkes! The popular e-series will be available in a single paperback in November from St. Martin's Press. Read about the acquisition.

- There's news on the e-book lending front: "Macmillan Poised to Test Library E-book Model." (via Publishers Weekly)

- And your cat needs one of these:

cat unicorn hat

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Monday Fun Day! (2/27/2012 Edition)

Welcome back, Monday!

- Library Journal's Douglas Lord strikes again with another round of bada** books for dude-identified readers. He said there has been "mucho good new reading around BFD HQ lately," including two of our books:

On CITY OF BOHANE by Kevin Barry he said, "It’s elegiac, lyrical, rollicking fun that mixes Brian Friel with A CLOCKWORK ORANGE." And he recommends that you try it "if you are tired of the same old crap."

On THE FOREST LAIRD: A Tale of William Wallace by Jack Whyte he said, "There’s brotherhood, patriotism, and political intrigue. And archery."

See all of the good Lord's recommendations in "The Good Guys, the Bad Guys, and the Ugly Guys in Six Suspenseful New Novels."

- Flavorwire took a liking to this year's Debut with the Best Library-Themed Cover (according to us), GIRLCHILD! They said, "The book is an inventive, electric story of youth and survival, as smart, Girl Scout-obsessed Rory, refusing to accept her fate as one of the 'third-generation bastards surely on the road to whoredom,' navigates her world." Earn your literary girl survivalism badge by reading your way through Hassman's book list (link).

Orlando Book- Following up on my #FridayReads: I finished the curious debut SHINE SHINE SHINE this weekend... no thanks to this mischievous feline! Nice try, cat, but you can't sabotage my weekend reading that easily!

- Also check out my paperback book club picks!

- And finally, this week's Macmillan Library Author Crush, er, I mean Profile is... Brad Parks! If you didn't catch the Author Buzz Focus for THE GIRL NEXT DOOR in Shelf Awareness, take a peek here!

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Monday Fun Day! (2/13/2012 Edition)

Happy Monday, lovely librarians! Let's kick of the week with some great reads.

- For the SHADES OF MILK AND HONEY fans out there, tor.com posted a nice long excerpt from the beginning of the sequel, GLAMOUR IN GLASS. It begins,

"There are few things in this world that can at once delight and dismay to the same extent as a formal dinner party."

Read the full excerpt here.

- Shelf Awareness reviewed Esi Edugyan's Scotiabank Giller-winning novel, HALF-BLOOD BLUES. They said,

"One of the risks of historical fiction is that the history can get in the way of the fiction; the author's imagination is often crammed into a box of flat characters and plodding narrative in the name of accuracy. Such is not the case with Esi Edugyan's atmospheric second novel. [...] Edugyan's prose sparkles not only with the jive and banter of jazz musicians, but also with the metaphors of a music built on improvisation."

Read the full review here.

- NPR did a feature on Tupelo Hassman's GIRLCHILD (which you will recognize as the Featured Cover from our January e-newsletter!).

"Tupelo Hassman writes with such an eye for rough-and-tough detail, she obviously knows something about kids who have been given the dubious gift of premature autonomy."

Read the full feature here.

- Author S.J. Bolton posted a piece on Goodreads called "Why we need our libraries." She talks about the experience of her local library (in the U.K.) transferring into the hands of the community after the government withdrew support. Bolton was then asked to manage the future purchase and rotation of books which she gladly accepted. Here are a few choice quotes from the article:

"A library, like the pub, the post office, the village shop, is part of the fabric of the community."

"No one, especially not my neighbours, should imagine the battle is over. Passing libraries into community ownership hasn't saved them, it has given them a stay of execution. If we are to keep them into the future, we'll need the ongoing commitment of our volunteers and the financial support of our sponsors. Most of all, though, we will need our libraries to be used."

Read the full article here.

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